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leffres

Thanks for making the effort to look.

This is happening all over the place. There will be two more buildings on that block I (negatively) assume to be equally ugly. Probably both tear downs but one was in progress as of 09 January, see:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/polychrome/375615758/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/polychrome/375615749/

And take a look at what happened here, just east of us. Or for greater impact take a walk someday. And yes, it is not "our neighborhood" but at the same time it really is our extended neighborhood.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/polychrome/sets/72157594325946272/

Another enclave of this type of tear down and build is notable around Tilden and E. 28th. those phots also on the above Flickr site.

PLG rez

That's just terrible. Too bad because I've noticed many new developments in Williamsburg that are definitely in stark contrast to existing structures but still look good. How much more expensive can it possibly be to make something tasteful?

Jardinsbklyn

Thank you for posting this thread ATP.
Extending the HD is the way to prevent more "uglies bad cases" from popping up around the PLG blocs with architectural value that are not (yet) protected by the HD status...
I wonder : Doesn't landmarking depends on the will of the home owners of potentially "Historic" blocks, to present their request to the Landmark comission (ex. Chester court)? Or is it a more general neighbourhood association request, to ask the L.C. to re-examine and extend the H.D. boundaries ? Have home owners individually their say in that process ?

Jardinsbklyn

PLG rez,
It is not much more expensive to make something tasteful. It just takes a bit more time.
Hiring a good architect, with taste, that will put more thought on planning the homes and more time on the drawing board, there lies the extra expense.
That's where the problem is with those devellopments, everything, from project to execution is reduced to the dry minimum.
It just leaves a really grim impression.
But those home are also not intended to sell at Williamsburg prices to the Williamsburg crowd...The devellopers don't care about hiring a clever architect to plan those homes. Those houses are architectur-less, because architecture is not the point.
High returns and predatory real-estate is the point.

babs

The only thing that anyone can hope for structures like these is that in about twenty years they'll just fall apart of their own accord (hopefully, of course, with no-one living in them at the time!), because they're so poorly-constructed to begin with -- that or a more aesthetically-minded developer will buy them and tear them down to put up something decent.

Bob M

Jardinsbklyn,

You ask"Doesn't landmarking depends on the will of the home owners of potentially "Historic" blocks, to present their request to the Landmark comission (ex. Chester court)? Or is it a more general neighbourhood association request, to ask the L.C. to re-examine and extend the H.D. boundaries ? Have home owners individually their say in that process"

I think any interested persons could start the process,although, as i wrote earlier, I think it SHOULD start with residents of the blocks proposed for designation. It takes a great deal of lobbying with the LPC to push the process along. This was true even in the '70s and we had a relatively easy time then because LPC came to US with a proposal. Ultimately, IF the LPC goes along with working on any extension,individual homeowners (and anyone else) would have their say at a public hearing. FWIW, attending the hearing on the original HD designation in 1978, and hearing homeowner after homeowner testify in favor of designation, was a high point of my life. (IIRC only one person testified AGAINST designation--on the lines of "I don't want anybody to tell me what I can or can't do to my house).

tom

I wonder what will happen with those new developements and who moves in. For the first time since 1994 Section 8 is back. Easy rent for landlords

PLG rez

Section 8 isn't quite "back." They're issuing new vouchers, but only to clear out the original waiting list. They're not taking any new applications - so the # of units that will be newly dedicated to Section 8 is minimal.

babs

From my experience with landlords, Section 8 is not easy rent collection. Between the amazing amount of red tape involved with the city to begin with and the fact that Section 8 tenants are still supposed to pay some rent on their own (and often, apparently, don't), many landlords feel it's not worth the hassle. Landlords are not required to accept Section 8 or other programs for new tenants, only to continue to lease to tenants in place who may be on one of these.

Furthermore, there is a difference between "working Section 8," in which the tenant has a job and regular Section 8 -- I have worked with landlords who will take working Section 8 but not the others -- they maintain that wear and tear on their building, including increased hot water use, etc., occurs when the tenant is there all day and doesn't go to work.

I have also worked with potenetial tenants who have told me that they do not want to live in a building that accepts programs because they find that those buildings tend to be less well maintained and Section 8 tenants less respectful of their surroundings.

I agree -- rents in New York are too high, but the bureaucratic nightmares involved in city programs aren't helping either.

Jardinsbklyn

Can someone explain to me what is "section 8" ? Looks like the name of a covert operation or some secret service division...

Ed

Jardins - Section 8 is "welfare" housing. Doesn't it sound much nicer than the "W" word?

tomG

I have a friend that is a Section 8 landlord and he loves it. The government raises the rent for him every couple of years and he gets more for his place than he would if he straight up rented it. He says there is not much red tape involved and he loves the arrangement. I was not aware of the working Section 8 program. That sounds like an improvement to me.
I hope they find good tenants for those new places and don't gouge anybody.

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